Category Archives: Authors

How I’m Getting Back Into Regular Writing

I haven’t updated this blog with new content in a long time. Both my short story and my novel have been stalled. I hope to get a habit of regular writing started again.

Why?

The blog was due to burnout. Although this blog I’ve been publishing on for more than 3 years, I’ve grown exhausted at continuing that schedule proved to be tiring.

My Steps to Solving That

I’ve begun a new content calendar to get this (and other social media) onto a more regular posting schedule. In the past, I just posted online at random times. Hopefully, I won’t from now on.

To help me to post here more often, I’ll  prepare several posts before I launch them here, so I’ll have a bank of pieces to post every week. In the past, I would prepare one piece at a time; as a result, I would always have the pressure to update while the content suffered. This way, that pressure will be lessened.

That’s one piece of my new writing strategies:

Short Story/Novel

Short story collection

Short story collection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These too sat around untouched for a long time. Far too long.

The Reason for My Long Delay

The reason is also proof that I’m truly a writer: self-doubt.What is that? It’s something that many other writers have experienced (including the far-better-than-I Neil Gaiman): a voice in my head – and in many others – says that we’re not good enough, we can’t finish what we start either.

English writer Neil Gaiman. Taken at the 2007 ...

English writer Neil Gaiman. Taken at the 2007 Scream Awards. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The voice is crippling. I didn’t touch my novel for over a year as a result.

How I’m Solving That (regular writing)

Two things are helping The first is one we’ve always used for NaNoWriMo: ignore it.

There we call it our Internal Editor and do our best to not pay attention to it.

The other thing that I’m doing is that I joined a group called Ninja Writers. They have a pretty active Facebook Group [here], and also a Patreon that I’ve joined.

Ninja Writers logo

Ninja Writers is based off a philosophy espoused by the late Ray Bradbury:

Just write every day of your life. Read intensely. Then see what happens.

Photo of Ray Bradbury.

Photo of Ray Bradbury. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The basic idea is that every day I write for 10 minutes and I also read for another 10. The idea isn’t that new. I’m a member of another Group called 10 Minute Novelists [here], and I bought a book about starting a similar writing habit of 8 minutes per day.

Regardless of the amount of time, the important thing is to build up a regular habit of writing. I have to rebuild mine. Plus: so far, it helped me to finish the first draft of my novel, and to break my inertia on the short story for my e-mail list.

I thank Ninja Writers for that. I’m back to regular writing because of it.

I realize that I’ve said I was restarting before. I hope that this time it works.

List of Robert Heinlein’s Juvenile Novels

With my last post about Heinlein‘s juveniles, a list of them made sense. So, here they are:

Here’s the list of Robert A. Heinlein’s Juveniles

Robert Heinlein, SF YA Precursor

When I researched this on Wikipedia I found that I’m not the only person to make that link. 

Robert A. Heinlein, with Ginny Heinlein Robert...

Robert A. Heinlein, with Ginny Heinlein Robert and Ginny Heinlein in Tahiti 1980 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Robert A. Heinlein was   one of the three people seen as pillars of the Golden Age of science fiction (that’s another post). He wrote many books and short stories, but a period of his novels are considered as the start of YA, although he didn’t consider them as such.

Books by Robert A. Heinlein

The books that I’m referring to are his juveniles.

Between 1947 and 1958e had 12 such novels published by Scribner, with another (Starship Troopers) published by Putnam instead (Scribner rejected it) and another novel (Podcayne of Mars) listed as a juvenile, though he didn’t consider it one.

Heinlein didn’t consider these books as juveniles, at least not by nature. They were written for younger readers, but Heinlein had great respect for these younger readers, so he tried to write more challenging fare for them. In fact, this got him into hot water with his editors at Scribner, and often,  after he brought guns into his novels, starting with Red Planet.

He also wrote 2 short stories in Boy Scout magazine, Boy’s Life. He created them after his tours in WW II, trying to diversify his writing from only pulp SF magazines. These stories were serialized.

Not only focussed on boys, he took a challenge to write for girls too, which led to 3 Maureen “Puddin'” stories in Calling All Girls magazine. He liked the character so much that he lowered her weight and relocated her to Mars for Podkayne of Mars.

I have to re-read this book. The original ending was hated by fans, so Heinlein rewrote it, then had it published with both endings. I don’t remember what they were. It’s been  more than 3 decades since I read it.

Pundits call it a juvenile, but Heinlein himself did not. His involvement with Scribner and the juveniles line ended when they rejected Starship Troopers. As an aside, I don’t see a novel about interstellar wars as a book for young people, it was just not a great book to me.

What made the juveniles a step toward YA: youths are the protagonists of the stories. Not bad, considering they were written nearly 80  years ago.

Using a Blog to Attract Readers

Camp NaNoWriMo is still taking up my free time, so another guest post

By Autumn Birt

Start a Blog. It is one of the first pieces of advice given to aspiring authors. And it ends there like those three words provide all possible information on what you should do with said blog. It is like saying “build a rocket” without mentioning target, trajectory, size, fuel, or range!

When I first heard that advice, I was still trying to figure out how to write a book, much less how to format, e-publish, and market. I didn’t even know enough to ask “What should I do with a blog?” Much less the far more important question, “How do I use it to attract readers?” Starting a blog was something on the to-do list, checked off without much thought.

Over five years later and I’ve learned a few things. And one of them is what the heck to do with a blog, especially how it might help you attract new readers. Here are some quick tips to help you out!

1.Have Focus

By this, I mean everything from post topics to photo scheme. Someone landing on your blog page should know within 20 seconds that you are a writer and in what genre. Use that banner image well! Have it showcase an awesome photo related to your stories or mock-ups of your books. If you have free stories you are giving away, they should be front and center. Don’t leave someone landing on your site wondering what you do and if you are serious about it. Be serious about it.

And the focus does go for post topics too. Your mindset for every post should be “I am trying to attract readers.” So what attracts readers? It might be cooking, but I think there are better topics. Like: what the characters in your story might be cooking. Do they eat dragon? Hydroponic vegetables are grown in zero gravity? Or classic recipes from 1792?

2. Share the Story

One of the biggest mistakes I see new author-bloggers make is they talk only of the writing journey. Which is definitely important. Readers should know this is hard work and a tremendous effort to produce a novel. But you need to share what is going on in the story too!

Readers need to know more than how many months it took you and how many times you almost quit. It doesn’t say anything about what you are actually writing. Share the work you’ve done on creating a synopsis. Get opinions! Share excerpts from the novel, short stories from each of the characters, world building, and research. You spend months creating the background and minutiae of details that end up comprising a whole sentence in the finished novel. Want to know a great place to put all those bits that create the solid framework of the novel without really being visible to the reader? Your blog.

Don’t just tell readers that it took a long time and a lot of work to write a novel. Let them be part of the experience. Show, don’t tell holds true in blogging too.

3. Don’t Make it All About You

No one likes to hear incessantly about someone as if they are a narcissist in a room of mirrors. And that holds true about your blog and your stories. Have posts looking for feedback. Better yet, take that other piece of new writer advice to “read a lot of books” to heart and write book reviews! What better way is there to attract readers than to help them find new books?

Network with other authors. Offer guest posts and interview fellow writers. And don’t forget to reply to comments and thank people for stopping by. If you don’t know where to find other authors to network with … well this is probably a better use of social media than spamming potential readers about a new release. Look for authors in your genre on Twitter under the correct hashtag. Join a writer’s group on Facebook (I have two if you are looking!). The good news is meeting other authors is easier than tracking down new readers.

These three things will get you started. If I had a final piece of advice it would be that readers don’t come overnight. Expecting huge results of new followers and fans to your new blog would be an anomaly. Don’t get frustrated. Just like writing a novel, perseverance will create outcomes. You know very well that giving up produces zero results.

And take it from someone whose fifth blog post hit the front page of Freshly Pressed, fast, early exposure is sometimes not the best thing. I hadn’t found my voice or topic when that happened. I ended up with over a 1000 new followers and absolutely no clue what to say to them. Because I’d randomly started a blog because I was working on a book and I was blogging about every odd and random thing that popped into my head. The post that made it big? It was on Work/Life Balance. Not writing. I don’t think I even mentioned I was a writer in it! Oh to go back now…

I can’t, but hopefully I can give you some advice to get it right! And if you are a writer with a blog, I’d love to see it. I’m looking for a few writing blogs to go over and feature in my next course: Blogging for Authors. So if you don’t mind exposing your website to a critical eye and getting some feedback on things to tweak, leave a comment with your website in the notes below!

Best of luck and happy blogging AND writing!

Autumn is a best-selling author in fantasy, epic fantasy, and war – not all of the same series, though! She is the author of the epic fantasy, adventure trilogy on elemental magic, the Rise of the Fifth Order. Her newest series is Friends of my Enemy, a military dystopian/ dark fantasy tale laced with romance. Friends of my Enemy which was released in full in 2015. Meanwhile, she is working on a new epic fantasy trilogy, Games of Fire, set in the same world as the Rise of the Fifth Order. If she stops goofing off and enjoying hobbies such as hiking, motorcycling, and kayaking, she may even be able to release all the books in 2016. Book 1, Sparks of Defiance, was released in March!

Stop by her website and blog to learn more about the worlds of her books and to pick up writing tips, workbooks, and courses at www.AutumnWriting.com. You can also find her on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Author.Autumn.Birt or more frequently on twitter @Weifarer.

 

fifth order

friends of my enemy

Elmore Leonard

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmore_Leonard

220px-Elmore_Leonard

I know that this is a few days late to actually be news. I am just sharing what he meant to me.

(This will also be the first time that I ever posted something remotely negative on this blog.)

The news: this 87-year old author died. He had 45 novels to his name as well as screenplay credits. Some of his most popular novels were turned into movies, the most famous being Get Shorty with Jackie Brown a close second.

I first discovered his writing in a crime fiction course at junior college in 1987. Glitz was the book. Look for it yourself… Amazon sales links from me would be crass. Right away his writing style appealed to me.

He was against flowery text or fancy wording. He felt that they slowed down the stories. As a result his words in  print were lean and to the point. His ear for dialogue always was great reading.

He was known to me as an author of suspense and crime fiction, but he began his career writing westerns. The 3:16 to Yuma (hopefully I have the title right) was one of his.

He was a writer that I’ll never forget. If I can ever write dialogue similar to his I’ll be a happy man.

 

I’m giving a friend and fellow writer some hype here:

  • Come out to celebrate the launch of Judge Not. Food will be provided, and the first 20 people through the door will get a special gift. And while you’re there, try one of Mariposa Cafe’s fine selection of hot and cold beverages.

    Copies of Judge Not will be available for sale and signing at the event. If you want to buy your own copy in advance and have it signed, feel free to visit the following link and buy a copy online: http://amzn.com/1480277525

Story vs. Dramatica

I read about Story this morning. It’s by Robert McKee, the author of Chinatown, long considered one of the best screenplays and movies of all time. So, I looked it up on Amazon.

Cover of "Story: Substance, Structure, St...

 

What was also mentioned was Dramatica, also a book about writing stories, but one with a different approach to them. I researched them both.

My research showed me something very important: Story is expensive. The book is likely out of print, but the Kindle version is even more expensive, over 25 bucks US. On the other hand Dramatica was $7.99.

That made the one to choose an easy choice.

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Interesting Chuck Wendig Books

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These are available in both paper and Kindle form.