Category Archives: NaNoWriMo

My changed view on NaNoWriMo

I’ve done NaNo since 2003 and tried Camp NaNoWriMo this past July. The

Things Have Changed

Things Have Changed (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

first four times I ‘won’ the 50 K challenge, but didn’t achieve it ever since, and didn’t achieve the goal for Camp either. I didn’t even get halfway there.

My Changed View

What I’ve come to realize is that I’m now putting too much pressure on myself to complete the marathon, to the point that I’m stalled to actually do so.

So, I’ll plan to try a different approach and see how it works for me:  from now on I’ll use the start of a NaNo event to spur me to start a project (a novel in November, something else for Camp) but I won’t concern myself with completing the target by the deadline date.

Maybe by not pressuring myself I’ll succeed at it more often again. I want to always finish the book that I start, instead of leaving it to be forgotten when the event is over. Some of my past projects I already plan to revisit, some of them I need to rewrite from scratch because I no  longer have my backups. Just as well, as the new versions won’t feel as clunky.

An Important Caveat

Note that I’m not bashing NaNoWriMo in the least. I’ve been a part of it since nearly its start (I think there were three before I began) and it can help an author to get the words out of their head – and  my view may change yet again, many times in fact– but for now this is what I’ll try, and see how it works.

“Don’t Get it Right. Just Get it Written.” James Thurber

Blog

 

Preparing for NaNoWriMo

The setup for NaNoWriMo at home, if I need to ...

The setup for NaNoWriMo at home, if I need to be portable. Long exposure lit by sweeping aLED flashlight over the scene. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 (I began this post before this event; I’ll state what I didn’t do.)

… or Camp NaNoWriMo, which I’m doing right now… which is why I haven’t updated this site in a week.

Camp scene, preparing for dinner, by Buell, O....

Camp scene, preparing for dinner, by Buell, O. B., 1844-1910 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here are some tips to achieve your word goal in the month (50, 000 for NaNo, variable for Camp – I’m writing a 20, 000-word project, for example):

1. Avoid distractions

Scrivener can do distraction-free writing via its full-screen mode. The text editor part  is all that you see. You don’t see the Binder, or the menus,  or anything else. All you have to focus on is writing.

Scrivener (software)

Scrivener (software) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are more distractions that you should avoid. Avoid e-mail, Twitter, and (especially) Facebook; most of it is flashy graphics that draw your attention away.

Twitter

Twitter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I failed on most of this. My blog subject list is in Drive, so I was usually in Gmail. I had my Twitter feed open at all times and kept it open to check on. As to Facebook… there’s a good reason that it has the nickname ‘Wastebook’… I was on it constantly.

2. Word-Padding is Your Friend

Always write full character names. Don’t use contractions; spell each word. Your fingers accidentally space words out? Leave them in. You don’t need the word ‘that’ in a sentence? put it in anyway. Adverbs slow a sentence down? Doesn’t matter. Use them anyways.

For NaNo / Camp NaNo quantity is your goal, not quality. The next point will talk about that fact.

At first, I didn’t  fully embrace this. I tried to correct my typos. I got out of it eventually.

3. This is the First Draft

Cleaning up what Ernest Hemmingway said about first drafts, they are not pretty.

Feel free to write scenes that you will cut in later drafts. They will add words now; you can cut them in later drafts.

I did this one. I wrote some scenes that I know I’ll cut later.

4. Ignore Your Inner Editor

As you write you’ll hear a voice in your head correcting your words and critiquing your scenes. Ignore it.

It’s the voice of your Inner Editor trying to slow you down. It will stall you  if you let it.

I didn’t.

** update **

Here's a tip that some people use, but I don't:

Some people count the words that they write for other projects in this one. I'd consider doing this cheating myself.

conclusion

Use these tricks and (unlike me) you might win.

 

Camp NaNoWriMo 2016 – How Did I Do?

Not as good as I’d like, but still good. Let me explain:

My final word tally was 9015 words out of a goal of 20, 000. That’s   the part not so good.

The setup for NaNoWriMo at home, if I need to ...

The setup for NaNoWriMo at home, if I need to be portable. Long exposure lit by sweeping an LED flashlight over the scene. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I didn’t have my story outline done, so I lost valuable time ‘pantsing‘. Regular readers of this blog know I’m not effective at that.

Another problem is that I didn’t really get into my writing groove until the last week. If it had happened sooner I might have a different post here now!

How it’s still good: I realized that my story would be less than 20, 000 words. I wanted to revise my goal down, but I came to that realization 5 days too late to do it.

I’ll take 3 days off, then get back to it. I intended it for people to opt-in to my mailing list, and I still have that intention.

 

Pantsers vs. Plotters

With me starting at Camp NaNoWriMo on July 1st I thought that I should explain the difference between these two story methods, and what I do or don’t.

“Pantsers”

This is an expression, short for “writing by the seat of your pants”. A writer goes into a project with nothing planned and just writes what comes to them. They have no characters planned, no scenes either. They just make everything up as they go along writing.

For some people this is the best way to work on a project. They are always surprised by what appears on their screen (or on their typewriter / paper), and as a result don’t have many predictable turns in their stories.

Me? I ‘ve tried it for many years — and won the first 4 — but it proved to be too open for me. I needed more structure to guide me.

Outliner

The opposite alternative is to work from a detailed outline of your story. Even the characters are defined — in name, personality is sketched, their character File:Plotextraktor.pngarcs are mapped  out, the works.

Some people like that level of planning. They can come to finish novels often that way.

Personally, I find that much structure too much. I like to have some measure of surprise in my writing, so control to that level I find stifling.

That led me to an alternative:

not snowflake

File:Snowflake11 2.png
Here‘s a description of how it’s done.

I find this method still tends to be too stifling. It still doesn’t leave room for surprises and twists.

Instead I use a hybrid method that incorporates story beats.

the beat goes on…

I create character sketches, and I outline some scenes (like the end) but I leave the rest open, so that I can still come up with other scenes that will surprise me.

I guess you would call it planned chaos.

chose your own way

Note that this is how I do it.  You may chose to do things differently; say how in the comments.

 

Space Opera — What is It?

This is a genre that’s existed for decades, but it’s often misunderstood.
It was considered as Science Fiction in the 1950s, the Golden Age of Science Fiction, but it’s really a form of Science Fantasy. There are many worlds of aliens, in fact hundreds, which gave it the veneer of science fiction. How it no longer fits it:

There are myriad inhabited worlds, often within the same systems. Science shows us that’s not the case, without major terraforming. That is a concept that didn’t exist in those early days.
Entire worlds often have a single feature, such as a desert world or an ice planet. Just look at Earth… we have different climates based on different areas. Just winter alone is different here in Canada and in Northern Europe – and it’s non-existent in the equator zone.
A major example is the Lensman series by E.E. “Doc” Smith, and in film: the Star Wars saga.

E. E. "Doc" Smith

E. E. “Doc” Smith (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

(Note that I’m not ragging on Star Wars. I’m a fan). Star Wars because there are so many worlds with life on them, and entire worlds just one climate.

Technically it isn’t entire worlds with a sole environment. A good writer could say that we just see part of a world, so the entire world isn’t just one environment type… but for the sake of this genre it’s considered to be.

Also, there are more intelligent versions of this genre. Lois McMaster-Bujold has her series of Vorkosigan novels set in a Space Opera universe, but she uses more science fiction ideas in it than others do.

Lois McMaster Bujold. Photo: David Dyer-Bennet...

Lois McMaster Bujold. Photo: David Dyer-Bennet 1996. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The main definition of space opera, according to its entry on Wikipedia, is that a space opera is like a ‘soap opera in space’. This is a bit simplistic, but they are often melodramatic stories involving ship combat, or romances and betrayals. We see them in standard SF, but far less melodramatic.
The Wikipedia article lists Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series as an example of Space Opera; I have trouble with that. First off, I’m a big Asimov fan. The Mule is an example of a large power escalation — cited as a characteristic of Space Opera — but Isaac didn’t write deep romance, and he was an actual scientist; his writing did have a more believable basis (I’m not saying that Psychohistory is real.
My 2nd NaNoWriMo novel (Into the Flock, a winner) was a Space Opera. I may try to redo it someday.

NaNoWriMo 2013: How Did I Do?

As you can see above, it wasn’t a victory. Well, not for the competition, anyway. It’s still quite an accomplishment from zero words.

I have a good outline. My characters are well-defined. I wrote daily but not with enough BIC (Butt in Chair) to make my daily word quota. Thus, I’m not far enough in for my tastes.

I’ll take a break from it for several days to finish other projects, then I’ll continue it. Some people backed it, and I promised to get it done for them, rewrites and all. I keep my promises. Beside, I want to see if it will sell well in the Amazon platform.

NaNoWriMo 2013: My First Post

I haven’t updated here for some time for several reasons.

First was the Indiegogo campaign that I mentioned here. I asked many people that I know to get it funded. A few did, many didn’t. Some of those who didn’t seem a bit miffed. I’m hoping that some if not most of them will talk to me again.

In the end I didn’t achieve my campaign. However that hasn’t stopped me…

NaNoWriMo 13: I’m attempting the first draft of this novel as my NaNo this year. As my progress widget shows I’m further behind than I’d like but I’ve at least started it!

So what are my projects now?

It’s nearly a week since NaNoWriMo finished, but I’ve had my rest from it; now I have other things to work on…

Now I have the stats to write for 3 versions of Hunters’ Inc. Fortunately I already have the text written. Now comes 3 different ruleset write-ups for the characters.

Page view statistics for WikiProject Video gam...

Page view statistics for WikiProject Video games in Wikipedia:WikiProject Video games/Traffic statistics. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

NaNoWriMo 2012: How’d I Do?

First off: my apologies. Save for my progress bar for my novel, I didn’t really update this blog all November.

I was hard at work on my novel, but not hard enough. I never made my daily word quota, my most productive day 1400 words. My final word count:  23923. Almost — but not quite — halfway.

That’s a personal victory. Last year due to exhaustion from work I didn’t even write 19 K. New director for my work program and I topped it.

Here’s a little ‘secret’ about NaNo: getting to the finish line is great, but even if I had just written 1 word, I would already have won. The number of people who have even begun a novel before is minimal.

 

Another Worthy Kickstarter and Updates

English: Kick starter

English: Kick starter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/scottroche/the-way-of-the-gun-a-bushido-western-anthology

This one has 4 days to go and still needs to raise a lot of funds to succeed.  If you haven’t yet, please support it – and if you already have increase your pledge.

A big reason why I didn’t update this blog in nearly a week was due to my preparations for NaNoWriMo — specifically work on my novel outline.

It was going slow at first until I changed my approach. I’m now just naming the scenes instead of writing notes on them. As a result I now have 44 scenes listed.

To achieve 50 thousand words though I’ll either have to come up with more scenes on the fly or simply write a lot of words for the ones I already have.