Tag Archives: Patreon

How I’m Getting Back Into Regular Writing

I haven’t updated this blog with new content in a long time. Both my short story and my novel have been stalled. I hope to get a habit of regular writing started again.

Why?

The blog was due to burnout. Although this blog I’ve been publishing on for more than 3 years, I’ve grown exhausted at continuing that schedule proved to be tiring.

My Steps to Solving That

I’ve begun a new content calendar to get this (and other social media) onto a more regular posting schedule. In the past, I just posted online at random times. Hopefully, I won’t from now on.

To help me to post here more often, I’ll  prepare several posts before I launch them here, so I’ll have a bank of pieces to post every week. In the past, I would prepare one piece at a time; as a result, I would always have the pressure to update while the content suffered. This way, that pressure will be lessened.

That’s one piece of my new writing strategies:

Short Story/Novel

Short story collection

Short story collection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These too sat around untouched for a long time. Far too long.

The Reason for My Long Delay

The reason is also proof that I’m truly a writer: self-doubt.What is that? It’s something that many other writers have experienced (including the far-better-than-I Neil Gaiman): a voice in my head – and in many others – says that we’re not good enough, we can’t finish what we start either.

English writer Neil Gaiman. Taken at the 2007 ...

English writer Neil Gaiman. Taken at the 2007 Scream Awards. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The voice is crippling. I didn’t touch my novel for over a year as a result.

How I’m Solving That (regular writing)

Two things are helping The first is one we’ve always used for NaNoWriMo: ignore it.

There we call it our Internal Editor and do our best to not pay attention to it.

The other thing that I’m doing is that I joined a group called Ninja Writers. They have a pretty active Facebook Group [here], and also a Patreon that I’ve joined.

Ninja Writers logo

Ninja Writers is based off a philosophy espoused by the late Ray Bradbury:

Just write every day of your life. Read intensely. Then see what happens.

Photo of Ray Bradbury.

Photo of Ray Bradbury. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The basic idea is that every day I write for 10 minutes and I also read for another 10. The idea isn’t that new. I’m a member of another Group called 10 Minute Novelists [here], and I bought a book about starting a similar writing habit of 8 minutes per day.

Regardless of the amount of time, the important thing is to build up a regular habit of writing. I have to rebuild mine. Plus: so far, it helped me to finish the first draft of my novel, and to break my inertia on the short story for my e-mail list.

I thank Ninja Writers for that. I’m back to regular writing because of it.

I realize that I’ve said I was restarting before. I hope that this time it works.

Crowdsourcing 201

To begin, there are two pledge levels that I forgot to mention before, but I’ve seen them for nearly every project I’ve joined, so they’re deserving of mention:

Pledge (song)

Pledge (song) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“$1”: you want to help out, but you just want to “get your feet wet”. For that you can pledge a single buck. It brings no perks with it, but it still helps the project move forward a bit. Dozens of such a pledge still add up.

“$5”: a larger bid with a sole perk: mention of your name in the Thanks, whether it’s a special page in a  book or comic book, or on a page on a Website (I’m listed on all 3 on different projects) …or whatever form it takes.

One thing: the Thanks are a part of every Perk level above $5 as well.

Where a project really gets cool is when it raises more than the target amount. Why?

Stretch Goals

After that amount, the folks who made the project add new features to their projects.

Take for example Grimtooth’s Ultimate Traps Collection.  These were a set of books that I read years ago in my game life…. traps in fantasy gaming of a darkly humorous bent. For this project all the out-of-print volumes  will be collected in a single hardcover volume. [I backed this]

Stretch goals included new books in this series, extra cloth bookmarks sewn in, even new backer-submitted traps.

Another example: a book that I backed made an audiobook version.

If the projects are the meat-and-potatoes then stretch goals are the neat desserts.

Crowdsourcing Sites

Indiegogo Website

This is the site that I used for my novel, but I think that I’ll use another one next time. I used it because of the flexible funding option available.

Flexible funding means that you get the funds collected — minus their fees — immediately, so even if you don’t make your target you still have something to start to work with.

Traditional thought is that if you don’t make your goal you don’t have to produce your  project — but in my case I don’t agree with that philosophy. Some people did back me, and I’ll finish my book as that’s what they paid for. Even though it’s taking me much longer than I’d like, I’ll get it done.

Kickstarter Website

You may have heard this mentioned a lot lately. Several films and TV shows were funded through this, as were many other projects. Two of my friends got funding for comic books through this, and many, many other projects.

Unlike Indiegogo, pledges collected here are only charged if the project funding target is made. As a result, if the funding goal isn’t achieved the amount collected is an even $0.

There are other crowdsourcing services, but for my needs they aren’t suited: Fundrazr is Canadian which suits me, but it’s better-suited to more altruistic projects than mine. Patreon  is, as the name suggests, a way to become a patron-crowdsourcer ongoing to an artist. I’m not *that* prolific. That wouldn’t be fair to my contributors.

One thing is for sure: whatever service that you go with you have a lot of promotion to do.