Tag Archives: Steampunk

Steampunk list

Here are references to get you into the genre:

English: The Great Wetherell Refractor - a ste...

English: The Great Wetherell Refractor – a steampunk telescope by artist Tim Wetherell. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Books

http://steampunkworkshop.com/nine-novels-defined-steampunk/

Games – Video Only

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Steampunk_video_games

All Games – Roleplaying Too

http://steampunk.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Steampunk_Games

This list includes Space: 1899. The original game is out of print, but I took part in a Kickstarter for the new version. Contact the project runners to find out if you can get it from them.

This is far from a complete list. I’ll likely update it over time. This will, at least, get you started.

Steampunk Omission

I forgot to mention an important aspect of Steampunk yesterday. It’s very important because it’s an element very common to all aspects of the genre:

Both in terms of the visual style and the mannerisms of the genre, the basis is the

English: Steampunk image of author G. D. Falks...

English: Steampunk image of author G. D. Falksen Français : Photo de l’auteur G. D. Falksen habillé en style Steampunk. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Victorian era. So: many of the adult males have mutton chops or long handlebar mustaches, many people have pocket watches, and there is an abundance of top hats, corsets, and parasols.

There are no airplanes; there are dirigible lines. Some stories have robots, but they’re clockwork automatons.

Guns exist since gunpowder does for centuries. For the genre, they tend to be pistols, shotguns, and rifles. There are no automatic weapons or machine guns — though prototypes of these things might exist for the story.

This gives me an idea for a list to come soon: a list of Steampunk-themed properties.

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What is Steampunk?

There has been a large wave of fandom for this in the past few years. There’s even an anthology of comics (I tried for it; unfortunately I was early in my learning of the Scrivener app and, as a result, I blew it). With all of the popularity I will still try to explain it.

First, here’s the definition on Wikipedia.

The book seen as having launched the genre is The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling (fathers of Cyberpunk). It has some slight similarities).

Bruce Sterling, original background edited wit...

Bruce Sterling, original background edited with simple brush strokes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve also heard (before the Wikipedia article) it compared to the

Portrait of author William Gibson taken on his...

Portrait of author William Gibson taken on his 60th birthday; March 17, 2008. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

works of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. Verne I can see, though not Wells. Well, for The Time Machine, yes… but not for 1984 or even Animal Farm…

What makes The Time Machine Steampunk is the technology: it’s windup, dials and clockwork devices, not electronics or computerized equipment. It draws some similarities to Cyberpunk in that man and machine are often merged, the difference being that the technology isn’t of the same kind. The former, not the latter.

Although in general fans didn’t like the film remake of The Wild, Wild West much, the film was very much Steampunk-style with all of the windup technology. There wasn’t electricity in that time period.

In essence, Steampunk is science fantasy, not science fiction. I’ll explain the difference in another post.

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